Durban Image: Image from page 537 of “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 34 December 1886 to May 1887” (1887)

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Image from page 537 of “Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 34 December 1886 to May 1887” (1887)
Durban
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: harpersnew72various
Title: Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Volume 34 December 1886 to May 1887
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: various
Subjects:
Publisher: New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers
Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University-Idaho

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
FLEET OF CRUSADERS. 690 HARPERS NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE. sharks by the score, and, most prized ofall, one solitary dolphin ? Did we notsail for a month of nights through a phos-phorescent sea, and behold in the firma-ment the constellations of both hemi-spheres at once ? ence of my life in a cyclone in the Bay ofBiscay. I had therefore been on many seas be-fore I made acquaintance with the Atlan-tic, and I must confess that, with all myvoyagings before me, I never recognized

Text Appearing After Image:
DISCOVERING NEW COUNTRIES. I have been a passenger m a Somalidhas, and tossed up with the surf like asea-weed on the beach of Ceylon, haveraced the porpoises over the bar at Durban,felt the boat grind beneath me among thebreakers off East London, and seen menrunning along the pier overhead with life-saving apparatus as tliey saw our boatdashed with the inrolling surf upon therock face at Bourbon. In a bark of sixhundred tons I ran the gauntlet of a liur-ricane in the Mozambique Channel wlioncrossing from Mauritius to the Zulu war,and on board one of the largest steamersof the Peninsular and Oriental fk^et, boundfor India, I nearly made the last experi- the full extent of the gulf that stretchesbetween the past and the present till Icrossed by the bridge to America. Onher trial trip I was a passenger on boardthe Kaiser i-Hiird, the most beautiful shipafloat on Eastern seas, and in Ismailia Baythere was the stately Orient, at once apalace and a fortress. And yet the over-whelming contra

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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